Water

EWG keeps you up to date with analysis of the latest news, interviews with experts and more.

Friday, September 18, 2009

Traditional Favoritism to Agricultural Interests Is Challenged as Demand Increases

Washington Post , Juliet Eilperin

BIG SKY, Mont. -- A hundred years after the city of Los Angeles and San Fernando Valley farmers battled neighboring Owens Valley for control over water from the Owens River, there's a new kind of water war in the West. From Montana to Arizona to California and beyond, alliances of environmentalists, fishermen and city dwellers are challenging the West's traditional water barons -- farmers and ranchers -- who have long controlled the increasingly scarce resource.

Thursday, September 17, 2009

Des Moines Register , Philip Brasher

Published May 29, 2009

Government conservation money in Iowa should be targeted to farms in areas that pollute the Mississippi River basin and cause a dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico, an environmental group says.

Monday, September 7, 2009

A frayed regulatory framework and dependence on voluntary action has done little to mitigate the damage from agricultural activities in the six states in the Chesapeake Bay watershed.

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

The Mississippi River Basin supports a vast array of economic, commercial, and recreational activities. But runoff from farm fields pollutes lakes and streams in the 10 states that border the Mississippi River. Farm sediment, fertilizer runoff and livestock waste are the source of over 70 percent of the pollution exacerbating the Dead Zone in the Mississippi River-Gulf of Mexico.

Tuesday, May 29, 2007

Every year, the Central Valley Project moves more than 2 trillion gallons of water - about 18 percent of California's fresh water supply - to thousands of farms in the state's arid heartland. Massive pumps push the water through 1,437 miles of canals.

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