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Children's Health

Collaboration focuses on protecting children across America from effects of toxic chemicals

With the generous support of the Jonas Family Foundation, in October 2016 EWG launched the Jonas Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, redoubling EWG’s decades’ long commitment to children’s environmental health with a bold new research agenda for 2017 and beyond.

The mounting evidence connecting children’s exposures to environmental contaminants and serious, life-altering health problems continues to grow, confirming that toxic chemicals in air, water and food are having adverse impacts on the well-being of our kids. Today, children may be exposed to a wide range of environmental hazards in schools and at home: lead, asbestos, PCBs, flame retardant chemicals, chemicals in cleaning products, pesticides, and various indoor and outdoor air pollutants. EWG has been on the forefront of the fight against these threats to children’s health, empowering parents and all citizens with information on how to avoid toxic exposures in everyday environments.

The partnership with the Jonas Family Fund complements EWG’s Healthy Child Healthy World program and will extend it further, by developing model safety standards for a number of pollutants that contaminate our air, water and land. The criteria for these limits will be based solely on health impacts, and will not be influenced by the interests of polluters who discharge these contaminants into the environment.

Through the Children’s Environmental Health Initiative, EWG will build on its established, game-changing research with new content and new communications strategies that will arm parents, politicians and concerned citizens with the tools and data necessary to protect current and future generations of children.

You can learn more by checking out some of our latest research below.

Friday, December 2, 2016

Heading into the holiday season, there was some good news out of the EPA. The agency listed the first batch of toxic chemicals it will tackle, which includes asbestos. Also this week, EWG took part in a forum to discuss how Congress and the Trump administration will shape the next farm bill.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Monday, November 28, 2016

One of the leading candidates for Secretary of Agriculture says bringing deep-fat fryers back to our schools isn’t about french fries.

It’s about freedom.

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 23, 2016

During a sit-down Tuesday with top brass from The New York Times, President-elect Donald Trump told the assembled journalists, columnists and editors that “clean air and ‘crystal clear water’ were vitally important,” the paper reported.

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Monday, November 21, 2016

During the campaign, President-elect Donald Trump pledged to residents of Flint, Mich., that the lead crisis that poisoned their drinking water “would have never happened if I were president.”
 

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Myron Ebell, head of President-elect Donald Trump's Environmental Protection Agency transition team, is a notorious denier of global warming whose biography unashamedly notes that activists consider him a "climate criminal."

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Photo Courtesy of Competitive Enterprise Institute

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Friday, October 28, 2016

It’s another busy week at EWG. Here’s some news you can use from this week.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, October 27, 2016

With the generous support of the Jonas Family Fund, EWG is launching the Jonas Initiative for Children’s Environmental Health, redoubling EWG’s decades-long commitment to children’s environmental health with a bold new research and advocacy agenda for 2017 and beyond, both organizations announced today.

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News Release
Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Scientists, pediatricians and public health officials from the U.S. and around the globe agree that there is no safe level of lead exposure. Even the smallest amounts can cause irreversible changes, including diminished IQ and behavioral problems in children.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, October 20, 2016

Hormone-disrupting chemicals take a staggering toll on U.S. health care costs and reduce American brain power, according to a shocking new study by a team of leading environmental health scientists.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Up to 14 million students in 26,000 U.S. schools could be exposed to unsafe levels of a notorious class of chemicals banned almost 40 years ago, according to a recent study by scientists at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.
 

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News Release
Thursday, September 29, 2016

Schools serving up to 14 million students may be contaminated with unsafe concentrations of PCBs leaching from caulks, sealants, and other aging building materials.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, September 23, 2016

A new report for the United Nations Committee on the Rights of the Child contends that protection from toxic pollution should be considered a basic human right.
 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Thursday, June 23, 2016

The new study by EWG and Duke University researchers shows that the exposures to the two chemicals were higher in Calif. than in a similar study done earlier in N.J.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, April 18, 2016

Though the current Zika outbreak has been concentrated in Latin America and the Caribbean, it has now reached Miami. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging pregnant women, women who might become pregnant and their partners to not to travel to a small community in Miami, just north of the city center, and to take strong precautions against mosquito bites.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, March 16, 2016

In 2014, federal agencies issued draft recommendations that women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or might become pregnant and young children eat more fish that is lower in mercury. Their advice is based on the fact that seafood consumption is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids and other nutrients.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, January 20, 2016

The Obama administration’s Dietary Guidelines for Americans, released in January 2016, are supposed to represent the best scientific judgments on what people need to do to stay healthy.  Instead, the 2016 edition of the guidelines, like those before it, are confusing to consumers and influenced by the $1 trillion-a-year food industry.

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Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Food should be good for you. Unfortunately, sometimes it isn’t. When we think of unhealthy food, what usually come to mind are fat, salt and sugar. But there are other things to be wary of. High on that list are food additives, which are found in almost all packaged and processed foods but are poorly regulated.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, October 15, 2010

Our homes aren't safe and clean if the air inside is polluted with chemicals from household cleaners.  Follow these simple tips to protect your family's health while you clean your home.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Sunday, October 18, 2009

EWG's scientists and public health researchers put our heads together and created a list of the most important steps you can take at home to promote your family's environmental health.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Liquid infant formula from the top manufacturers is sold in cans lined with a toxic chemical linked to reproductive disorders and neurobehavioral problems in laboratory animals, according to an investigation by Environmental Working Group (EWG). The chemical is almost as common in the packaging of powdered formula, with 4 of the top 5 companies acknowledging its use.

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Reports & Consumer Guides

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