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Energy

The Environmental Working Group's hard-hitting energy investigations hold energy producers accountable and point the way toward conservation and cleaner energy. EWG scrutinizes drilling and hydraulic fracturing for natural gas and oil, use of ethanol to power vehicles, wood-burning electricity generation, uranium mining and nuclear power.

Wednesday, August 31, 2005

Drivers in sprawling southern cities with few transportation options are forced to send more of their gasoline dollars abroad, including to Middle East oil producers where an unknown amount of oil money flows to anti-American extremists. Amid rising gas prices and calls for energy independence, an original Environmental Working Group analysis of oil dependence by metro area underscores the urgent need to broaden transportation options for gridlocked, car-dependent communities in order to decrease reliance on Middle East oil sources and increase national security over the long hau

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Thursday, April 14, 2005

During debate over the energy bill in the House Committee on Energy and Commerce on Tuesday, Representatives Hall, Green, Murphy, Rogers, Pickering, and Committee Chair Barton, among others, voiced their opposition to any restrictions on future oil and gas exploration within the United States. The committee majority shot down a number of minority amendments, including an amendment by Rep. Stupak of Michigan to prohibit directional, slant, or offshore oil and gas drilling on the Great Lakes.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, April 5, 2005

Two years ago, support for Tom DeLay's MTBE liability shield for oil and chemical companies stalled when documents surfaced showing the companies had, contrary to their claims, aggressively lobbied for MTBE's adoption as a gasoline additive. The memos and other correspondence showed that oil companies knew the toxic chemical would pollute drinking water, and that they — not the government — had pushed for its adoption anyway.

 
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Wednesday, October 20, 2004

A new analysis of Department of Energy (DOE) figures shows that in the wake of the 2002 Senate vote to approve the Yucca Mountain dumpsite, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission quickly and quietly approved license extensions at nuclear reactors nationwide.

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News Release
Wednesday, October 20, 2004
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, August 25, 2004

The oil and gas industry and federal officials repeatedly claim that environmental protections have blocked their access to Western lands and hurt efforts to reduce dependence on foreign sources of energy. However, a year-long review of Department of Interior records by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) shows the oil and gas industry has enjoyed decades of access to an enormous amount of Western lands. Yet during this period, U.S. dependence on foreign energy sources has continually increased.

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News Release
Thursday, July 29, 2004

Refineries, power plants and other large industrial facilities in California that violate clean air laws typically pay penalties lower than what an SUV driver may legally be fined for a smog violation, according to an investigation of enforcement records by Environmental Working Group (EWG).

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News Release
Tuesday, March 30, 2004

As Congress prepares to reauthorize a six-year transportation bill worth close to $300 billion, a first ever investigation of metro area transportation spending by the Environmental Working Group found that commuters in 176 metropolitan areas paid a total of $20 billion more in federal gas taxes than they received in federal highway trust fund money for both transit and highways from 1998 through 2003.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, March 10, 2003

Like other car companies, Ford has consistently fought mandatory increases in fuel economy for SUVs and other vehicles by invoking fears that higher mileage requirements would result in smaller, more dangerous vehicles.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Saturday, September 28, 2002

The House Republican leadership is considering legislation to strictly limit oil company liability for contaminating groundwater in at least 28 states with the toxic gasoline additive MTBE, or methyl tertiary butyl ether. The oil industry and its friends in Congress say it's only fair to shield MTBE makers from lawsuits, since, they claim, it was the government that mandated oil companies to reformulate gas with MTBE in the first place, to clean the air.

 
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Wednesday, May 1, 2002

Airborne soot and dust, technically known as particulate air pollution, causes or contributes to the deaths of more Californians than car accidents, murder and AIDS combined. State health officials are proposing new air pollution rules that could save or extend more than 6,500 lives a year, but the proposal faces strong and well-financed opposition from major oil companies and automakers.

 
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Sunday, July 1, 2001

California regulators have failed to order cleanup or take other legally binding enforcement action on more than 90 percent of the thousands of underground fuel storage tanks known to be leaking toxic chemicals into water and soil throughout the state, although many of the leaks were first reported more than 10 years ago, according to an Environmental Working Group (EWG) computer-assisted investigation. Even when cleanup was ordered, regulators almost never fined even the biggest polluters.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, June 14, 2001

Claims that corn ethanol is making a major contribution to America’s security and energy independence by reducing oil imports are wildly exaggerated, an analysis by Environmental Working Group (EWG) shows. Between 2005 and 2009, taxpayers spent a whopping $17 billion to subsidize ethanol. In return, they got a reduction in overall oil consumption equal to an unimpressive 1.1 mile-per-gallon increase in overall fuel economy.  

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, November 8, 2000

The production of electricity causes more damage to the environment than any other single human activity. Electricity production is now the largest single use of energy in the United States. Electricity generation is responsible for 69 percent of the sulfur dioxide and 32 percent of the nitrogen oxide emissions that foul the air and cause acid rain. Electricity use accounts for 35 percent of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions, the key culprit in global climate change. It is responsible for millions of miles of rivers and streams being disrupted by dams, hundreds of tons of nuclear waste that must find a permanent home somewhere, and thousands of tons of air pollutants that are a major cause of respiratory problems.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, October 17, 2000

In the final weeks of the election season, competing philosophies about pollution control have come to the fore in presidential politics. A new computer investigation by the Environmental Working Group indicates that Gov. George W. Bush's approach to pollution control has been a major factor in making Houston the nation's smoggiest city and Texas our smoggiest state. Because states play a decisive role in implementing federal pollution laws, the Texas experience will have profound implications for clean air nationally under a Bush administration.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, November 3, 1999

The Justice Department and USEPA announced actions against 32 power plants that they claim are operating in violation of the Clean Air Act.

 
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, September 2, 1999

Most voters do not know that George W. Bush's policy advisors typically work for corporate front groups working for goals far outside the mainstream environmental perspective.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, September 1, 1999

Urban and suburban high- ways account for less than three percent of road miles in metropolitan areas, yet they carry more than one third of all vehicle miles traveled in our nation’s cities and suburbs. As Congress tackles reauthorization of the nation’s transportation law, the 1991 Intermodal Surface Transportation and Efficiency Act (ISTEA), these interstates, free- ways, and expressways — the vital core of the country’s road network — are crumbling. The main reason is that each year state Departments of Transportation (DOTs) divert billions of dollars available for road repair to the construction of new highways, typically on the suburban fringe.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, August 24, 1999

In the five years before electricity deregulation, California utilities cut funding in half for programs that save energy, save customers money, and help save the environment.

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News Release
Tuesday, August 24, 1999

In the five years before electricity deregulation, California utilities cut funding in half for programs that save energy, save customers money, and help save the environment. According to an analysis of federal data by the Environmental Working Group (EWG), the wasted energy would supply a year’s worth of power to more than 600,000 homes, and would have cost California consumers almost $450 million at pre-deregulation rates.

 
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