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Asbestos

EWG research showed that 10,000 people die each year of asbestos-related diseases and unearthed documents showing that corporate executives concealed for decades the dangers of making or handling asbestos-containing materials.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Today the Environmental Protection Agency released documents indicating it will dramatically scale back its safety evaluations for 10 chemicals under the revamped Toxic Substances Control Act

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News Release
Thursday, May 17, 2018

More than 60 nations have banned all uses of asbestos. Shockingly, the U.S. isn’t one of them. The nation’s new toxics law gives the Environmental Protection Agency the power to completely ban the notorious killer, but the chemical industry is pushing for continued exemptions for some uses.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, February 26, 2018

The full-page ad on the back of this year’s Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue is supposed to be funny.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, February 22, 2018

Public interest and government watchdog groups have petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency for all its communications with the chemical industry on the fate of asbestos under the new federal chemicals law.

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News Release
Tuesday, February 20, 2018

A rash of product recalls, government warning notices and contaminated cosmetics may finally push Congress to give our broken cosmetics law a makeover.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, February 9, 2018

EWG News Roundup (2/9): Here’s some news you can use going into the weekend.

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News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, February 7, 2018

Today EWG praised legislation introduced by Rep. Debbie Dingell, D-Mich., that would mandate warnings for cosmetics marketed to children that might contain asbestos.

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News Release
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

When asbestos is found in products children put on their bodies, enough is enough. 

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, May 15, 2017

Seat belts. Two pilots in every cockpit. Cribs that don’t strangle infants. These federal rules, and many others, have saved a lot of lives over the years. In the process they’ve made American consumer products better and given customers more confidence in their purchases.

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Planet Trump
Article
Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Last year, former President Barack Obama signed an update to the federal Toxic Substances Control Act into law, finally giving the EPA authority to ban asbestos use and importation. The agency is moving full steam ahead. But this progress could be stalled if Scott Pruitt, President Trump's nominee to head the EPA, is confirmed by the Senate.

Copyright © 2017, EWG Action Fund. All rights reserved. http://www.asbestosnation.org. Reproduced with permission.

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Planet Trump
Article
Thursday, November 17, 2016

Our next president thinks asbestos – a carcinogen that kills up to 15,000 Americans a year, with no safe level of exposure – "got a bum rap."

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Planet Trump
Article
Wednesday, July 20, 2016

The nation’s new chemical safety law promises to give the Environmental Protection Agency expanded authority to regulate hazardous chemicals in consumer products. But of the tens of thousands of chemicals on the market, most never tested for safety, which should the EPA tackle first?
 

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News Release
Thursday, March 17, 2016

Your kids spend most of the day at school, and you may be surprised at what they could be breathing in their classrooms, cafeterias, hallways and gymnasiums: deadly asbestos fibers.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, February 18, 2016

In 1971 Ford Motor Company decided that $1.25 per car was too much to spend on safer alternatives to asbestos brakes. Thirty years later, in the face of mounting lawsuits, Ford began spending millions for questionable studies trying to show that brake mechanics exposed to asbestos are not at increased risk of cancer.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, September 14, 2015

Federal regulators have known for almost 40 years that the talc in personal care products can be contaminated with deadly asbestos fibers but left it to the cosmetics industry to monitor itself, according to documents published this week by an independent investigative news site.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, September 10, 2015

On the morning of September 11, 2001, 92 passengers boarded American Airlines Flight 11 from Boston to Los Angeles. Around the world, we watched the unthinkable terrorist attacks on our nation as that hijacked plane and then three others crashed into the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and an empty field in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

 

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, September 8, 2015

In less than 20 minutes, the terrorist-controlled airliners hit both towers of the World Trade Center complex on the morning of September 11, 2001.  As tens of thousands of workers and residents in lower Manhattan strained to get out of the area, a group of Americans worked their way toward the buildings and an emergency situation the likes of which they’d never seen.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, July 13, 2015

Our shocking new report uncovered four brands of crayons and two brands of kids’ crime scene kits that tested positive for deadly asbestos. What’s worse, these contaminated toys are being sold across the country with no warning!

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, June 30, 2015

More than 50 years after a landmark study confirmed the lethal effects of asbestos exposure, we still don’t know exactly how many people asbestos kills.
 

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, June 25, 2015

Many people think asbestos exposure is a thing of the past, but today, it remains a deadly public health concern.

 

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News and Analysis
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