Chromium-6

EWG found cancer-causing chromium-6 in tap water from 31 of 35 cities it tested. Americans deserve the protection of official safety standards to protect our water and health. Learn more.

Sunday, April 3, 2011

EWG’s study of chromium-6 contamination in tap water is not the first to attempt to assess chromium-6 pollution across the country. 

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, March 28, 2011

Some water utility representatives have protested Environmental Working Group’s report of laboratory tests that found worrisome levels of chromium-6, a suspected carcinogen, in the drinking water of 31 cities across the country. Yet the tap water industry was worried enough about the contaminant to conduct its own extensive survey in 2004 that found clear evidence of widespread chromium-6 pollution in untreated source water. The survey, conducted by the Awwa Research Foundation (since renamed the Water Research Foundation), an offshoot of the American Water Works Association, obtained data on 341 source water samples from 189 utilities in 41 states. The conclusion: chromium-6 is common in American groundwater.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Thursday, March 17, 2011

The boom in natural gas drilling across the United States has spawned well-warranted fears that the fluids and chemicals used to free the gas from surrounding rock could pose a risk to drinking water supplies that tens of millions depend on.

Read More
News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, February 16, 2011

 

EWG urges California's Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment to set a strict public health goal for hexavalent chromium, also known as chromium-6, a probable carcinogen, and move rapidly to establish an enforceable legal limit for the pollutant in drinking water. 

Read More
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, February 3, 2011

Testing by four municipal drinking water suppliers has confirmed the results of a study by the Environmental Working Group that detected widespread contamination by chromium-6, a suspected toxic carcinogen.

Read More
News Release
Wednesday, February 2, 2011

Environmental Working Group's recent national study that detected widespread drinking water contamination by carcinogenic chromium-6 was the subject of intense discussion this morning at a well-attended and sometimes contentious 2½-hour U.S. Senate hearing.

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Wednesday, February 2, 2011

 

EWG president Ken Cook testifies that ensuring safe, accessible drinking water is a core responsibility of the U.S. government. 

Read More
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, January 11, 2011

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promised to help local water utilities address public concerns over the possible presence of hexavalent chromium (chromium-6) in drinking water, and today it delivered.

Read More
News Release
Monday, January 3, 2011

For years, California officials have been working to set the nation's first-ever safety standard for the carcinogenic metal hexavalent chromium (chromium-6), commonly found in the state's drinking water. Last week (Dec. 31), after specifically evaluating the pollutant’s threat to infants, public health officials sharply lowered their proposed “public health goal” to 0.02 parts per billion (ppb) of chromium-6 in drinking water.

Read More
News Release
Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Just two days after the release of Environmental Working Group's (EWG) analysis of chromium-6 (hexavalent chromium) contamination in the drinking water of 31 U.S. cities, the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has issued a comprehensive plan to help local water utilities address the problem.

Read More
News Release
Monday, December 20, 2010

Millions of Americans are drinking water contaminated with the carcinogenic chemical that came to national attention in the 2000 feature film Erin Brockovich. Laboratory tests commissioned by EWG found hexavalent chromium, or chromium-6, in the drinking water of 31 of 35 selected U.S. cities. Among those with the highest levels were Norman, Okla.; Honolulu; and Riverside, Calif.

Read More
News Release
Monday, December 20, 2010

Laboratory tests commissioned by EWG have detected hexavalent chromium, the carcinogenic “Erin Brockovich chemical,” in tap water from 31 of 35 American cities. The highest levels were in Norman, Okla.; Honolulu, Hawaii; and Riverside, Calif. In all, water samples from 25 cities contained the toxic metal at concentrations above the safe maximum recently proposed by California regulators.

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, December 15, 2010

EWG comments on EPA’s review of toxicological studies for hexavalent chromium say that there is no need to weaken the conclusions or delay issuing the document.

Read More
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, August 20, 2009

After more than a decade of fighting an across-the-board industry campaign, the California government has finally announced proposed health guidelines for the deadly cancer-causing chemical hexavalent chromium, or chromium-6 first made famous by environmental health crusader Erin Brockovich.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Thursday, May 24, 2007

After our May 16 blog about consultant Dennis Paustenbach's possible appointment to an EPA panel on asbestos, we received a letter from Dr. Paustenbach's attorney. It says our use of the word "fraud" in describing the involvement of Dr. Paustenbach's company, ChemRisk, in the publication of a since-retracted study on chromium-6 in drinking water was "false and defamatory."

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, May 17, 2007

 

EWG is disturbed to learn that Dennis C. Paustenbach is on the "Short List" of potential appointees to the Asbestos Panel of the EPA Science Advisory Board. EPA's Ispecifies that appointees to the Panel should display "absence of financial conflicts of interest" and "absence of an appearance of a lack of impartiality." Based on evidence of his work for defendant corporations in lawsuits over asbestos exposure, his studies that consistently aim to refute or minimize the scientifically established risks of asbestos exposure, and other evidence detailed below of a lack of adherence to scientific and professional ethics, it is clear that Dr. Paustenbach is unfit to serve on the Panel.

Read More
Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, May 16, 2007

He's back. Dennis C. Paustenbach, a.k.a. Dr. Evil, the science-for-hire consultant who rarely met a chemical he didn't like, is on the short list of potential appointees to the EPA Science Advisory Board Asbestos Panel. The panel has a crucial task: advising EPA's upcoming risk assessment for airborne asbestos, a killer that takes 10,000 American lives a year.

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, February 15, 2007

The Pump Handle’s David Michaels calls this triumph of investigative journalism to our attention.

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Monday, January 8, 2007

After pressure from EWG and an ABC News story, EPA has announced it will “deny all applications for registration of acid copper chromate, known as ACC, as a wood preservative pesticide intended for residential use.”

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, January 4, 2007

On January 19, EPA will decide whether to allow unrestricted use of a potent human carcinogen in lumber sold at hardware and home improvement stores. Hexavalent chromium–the "Erin Brockovich" chemical–is a key ingredient in a wood preservative the chemical industry is lobbying hard to keep on the market, before release of a major cancer study on the chemical expected later this year.

Read More
Key Issues:
News and Analysis
Article

Pages

Subscribe to Chromium-6