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Nanomaterials

These vanishingly small particles are turning up in thousands of new products, including cosmetics. EWG is pressing for more thorough research, because the health effects are still poorly understood.

Friday, April 17, 2015

Are intentionally engineered nanoparticles being added to our food? We don’t know for sure – and federal food regulators aren’t helping us find out the truth.
 

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Thursday, March 12, 2015

Responding to rising concern about manufacturers using unregulated nanomaterials in food, a coalition of advocacy groups in the U.S. and abroad has released a policy recommendation for companies in food-related industries to assist them in avoiding or reducing the risks from nanomaterials in food products and packaging.

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News Release
Wednesday, August 17, 2011

EWG submits comments urging the FDA and EPA to take a closer look at nanomaterials, broaden their definition of these substances and fully assess the risks to public health.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, September 30, 2010

EWG opposes an EPA pesticide office plan for conditional registration of a nanoscale silver chemical known as HeiQ AGS-20 and used as an antimicrobial, pesticide and textile preservative. EWG asks the agency not to approve this chemical’s use in consumer products until its maker produces all the data EPA typically requires for regulation of antimicrobials and until an EPA evaluation of these data determines that the product is safe for people and the environment.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Monday, September 27, 2010

EWG comments to EPA’s National Center for Environmental Assessment question a case study’s failure to clearly present conclusions about the possible effects on people and the environment of nanoscale silver. EWG calls on the agency to conduct thorough health and safety evaluations of novel nanoscale materials prior to market entry.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Wednesday, September 15, 2010

Washington, D.C – Environmental Working Group (EWG) has sent a letter to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) opposing its proposal to approve a Swiss nanosilver textile coating for sale in the U.S.

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News Release
Tuesday, August 14, 2007

Sometimes the little stuff makes a big difference.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, January 29, 2007

While many scientists believe that most nanomaterials will ultimately prove to be benign, ETC Group -- which has called for a moratorium on the marketing of nanoproducts until more safety studies are done -- believes in erring on the side of caution.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, October 10, 2006
EWG's analysis of 25,000 personal care product labels found that more than 250 products on the market today contain one or more of 57 different types of nano-scale or micronized ingredients identified on product labels. Another 9,500 products contain ingredients that are available in nano-form, but were not labeled as either nano-sized or conventional-sized on the label. The absence of a clear government definition for nano-materials makes quantifying their presence in personal care products even more difficult. Read More
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News Release
Tuesday, October 10, 2006

EWG submits comments to FDA on the need for a public process to identify and evaluate the safety of nanomaterials in cosmetics. Recommendations to FDA include the need to identify nano-scale materials in personal care products and complete product safety evaluations in those cases.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, September 26, 2006

From The Washington PostThe United States is the world leader in nanotechnology -- the newly blossoming science of making incredibly small materials and devices -- but is not paying enough attention to the environmental, health and safety risks posed by nanoscale products, says a report released yesterday by the independent National Research Council.

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