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Water

Nothing is more important to your health and quality of life than safe drinking water and clean streams and lakes. Across the country, pollution from farms is one of the primary reasons water is no longer clean or safe. Agriculture is the leading source of pollution of rivers and streams surveyed by U.S. government experts, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Thankfully, if we make simple changes in the way we farm, we can take a big step toward clean water.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016

In recent years, important bipartisan progress has been made to food policy, including new food safety laws, new rules and incentives for healthier packaged foods, increased access to healthier foods, new rules to require healthier food in schools, and efforts to make food labels more transparent.

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AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, November 29, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump is skeptical about climate change. But if he's wrong and scientists are right, his Mar-a-Lago mansion and golf resort in Palm Beach, Fla., and other properties bearing his name in the Sunshine State and elsewhere are threatened by global warming-driven rising sea levels.

 

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 23, 2016

During a sit-down Tuesday with top brass from The New York Times, President-elect Donald Trump told the assembled journalists, columnists and editors that “clean air and ‘crystal clear water’ were vitally important,” the paper reported.

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Monday, November 21, 2016

During the campaign, President-elect Donald Trump pledged to residents of Flint, Mich., that the lead crisis that poisoned their drinking water “would have never happened if I were president.”
 

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Friday, November 18, 2016

At EWG we’re fans of swamps.

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 16, 2016

“Drill, baby, drill!”

During her failed bid for vice president in 2008, that was Sarah Palin's crowd-pleasing chant promoting her energy policy. Now the pithy catchphrase – and the former Alaska governor herself – could make a comeback.

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Photo Courtesy of Christopher Halloran / shutterstock.com

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Planet Trump
Blog Post
Wednesday, November 16, 2016

When Americans gather to celebrate Thanksgiving next week, we may not agree on the outcome of the election. But we all agree that the food being served should be safe, healthy and clearly labeled. If we’re giving thanks in a restaurant, we will want calorie information on the menu and to know that the people preparing and serving their meals are paid a decent wage. And regardless of where we gather, we will want to be sure that their neighbors have enough to eat
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, November 3, 2016

Hurricane Matthew's rampage through North Carolina's coastal plain flooded more than 140 feces-strewn swine and poultry barns, more than a dozen open pits brimming with hog waste and thousands of acres of manure-saturated fields, an analysis by EWG and Waterkeeper Alliance reveals.

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News Release
Friday, October 28, 2016

It’s another busy week at EWG. Here’s some news you can use from this week.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 26, 2016

Scientists, pediatricians and public health officials from the U.S. and around the globe agree that there is no safe level of lead exposure. Even the smallest amounts can cause irreversible changes, including diminished IQ and behavioral problems in children.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 26, 2016

In the last three years, farmers in parts of California's Central Valley irrigated nearly 100,000 acres of food crops with billions of gallons of oil field wastewater possibly tainted with toxic chemicals, including chemicals that can cause cancer and reproductive harm, according to an EWG analysis of state data.

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News Release
Tuesday, October 25, 2016

When high water breaches animal barns, waste lagoons or fields with applied manure, the nearby surface water becomes toxic.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, October 21, 2016

Beginning this Friday, EWG will post news you can use – some of the recent media coverage featuring our content and spokespeople.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Friday, October 21, 2016

In the last three years, farmers have irrigated 95,000 acres of food crops with billions of gallons of oil field wastewater possibly tainted with toxic chemicals.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, October 17, 2016

It’s hard to think of an administration that has done more to change what Americans eat and how we grow our food than the Obama administration.
 

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AgMag
Blog Post
Wednesday, October 12, 2016

PFOA, a carcinogenic chemical formerly used to make DuPont's Teflon, contaminates drinking water for at least 7 million Americans and is in virtually everyone’s blood.

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, September 20, 2016
EWG estimates that water supplies serving 218 million Americans – more than two-thirds of the population – contain unsafe levels of chromium-6.
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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Drinking water supplies for two-thirds of Americans are contaminated with the carcinogenic chemical made notorious by the film "Erin Brockovich," which was based on the real-life poisoning of tap water in a California desert town. But there are no national regulations for the compound – and the chemical industry is trying to keep it that way.

 

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EnviroBlog
Blog Post
Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Under an Environmental Protection Agency program, from 2013 to 2015, local water utilities took more than 60,000 water samples and found chromium-6 in more than 75 percent of samples. The EPA's tests were spurred by a 2010 EWG investigation that found elevated levels of chromium-6 in the tap water of 31 of 35 cities sampled. EWG's analysis of the EPA data estimates that water supplies serving 218 million Americans have potentially unsafe levels of the chemical.
 

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News Release
Thursday, September 15, 2016

What if your neighbor poured toxic chemicals into your drinking water but only agreed to pay for part of the cleanup? Well, that’s exactly what’s happening in northeastern Wisconsin. 

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AgMag
Blog Post

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