Sign up to receive email updates, action alerts, health tips, promotions to support our work and more from EWG. You can opt-out at any time. [Privacy]

 

Tap Water

Most Americans enjoy high quality drinking water, but contamination by agricultural pesticides and disinfection byproducts is a problem for others. Check out your water supply with EWG’s National Drinking Water Database.

Monday, March 3, 2003

U.S. Senator Barbara Boxer (D-CA) today introduced legislation to protect drinking water from contamination by the toxic chemical perchlorate.

Read More
News Release
Monday, March 3, 2003

Drinking water for more than 20 million Americans is contaminated with a toxic legacy of the Cold War: A chemical that interferes with normal thyroid function, may cause cancer and persists indefinitely in the environment, but is currently unregul

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Friday, December 13, 2002

Secret tests conducted in 1984 by the DuPont chemical company found a Teflon-related contaminant (C8) in the tap water of the Little Hocking Water Association in Ohio, just across the river from the company’s Teflon plant in Parkersburg, West Virginia. But the company never told the community, its water utility or state regulators about the tap water testing program, which continued through at least 1989, or about the positive findings.

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, November 12, 2002

"Contamination of drinking water supplies by the toxic industrial chemical perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, or C8) is a continuing concern to the residents of Parkersburg and surrounding areas of Wood County near the source of the pollution, DuPont’s manufacturing operation in Washington, West Virginia."

Read More
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, January 8, 2002

The first ever nationwide assessment of chlorination byproducts in drinking water, released by the Environmental Working Group and U.S. Public Interest Research Group, shows that more than one hundred thousand women are at elevated risk of miscarriage or of having children with birth defects because of chlorination byproducts (CBPs) in municipal tap water.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Tuesday, January 8, 2002

First-ever nationwide assessment of chlorination byproducts in tapwater finds 137,000 U.S. pregnancies at higher risk of miscarriage, birth defects

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Monday, October 1, 2001

Chlorinating tap water is a critical public health measure that saves thousands of lives each year by reducing the incidence of waterborne disease. But chlorination is no substitute for cleaning up America’s waters.

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Monday, July 16, 2001

Sources of drinking water for more than 7 million Californians and unknown millions of other Americans are contaminated with a chemical that disrupts child development and may cause thyroid cancer, but is unregulated by the state or federal government, according to an investigation by Environmental Working Group (EWG).

Read More
News Release
Monday, November 27, 2000

On behalf of military contractor Lockheed Martin, Loma Linda University is conducting the first large-scale tests of a toxic drinking water contaminant on human subjects -- a precedent medical researchers and Environmental Working Group condemned as morally unethical and scientifically invalid.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Wednesday, September 1, 1999

Across Ohio, small and large businesses have polluted public drinking water supplies with impunity. An Environmental Working Group analysis of Ohio EPA data and an internal, unpublished report from the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (Ohio EPA) shows that industries have contaminated at least 54 public water supplies, but have been held responsible for contributing toward cleanup in only three cases.

 

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, July 1, 1999

n a little-noticed decision earlier this year, the EPA’s top scientific committee on children’s health declared that protections against the toxic weed killer atrazine in food and water should not be considered safe for infants and children. According to the Office of Children’s Health Protection Advisory Committee:

 

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, June 30, 1999

Atrazine, the most heavily used herbicide in the United States, is a cancer-causing weed killer applied to 50 million acres of corn each year. After it is applied each spring, it runs off cornfields and through drinking water plants into the tap water of millions of Midwestern homes.

Read More
AgMag
Blog Post
Friday, October 2, 1998

Pollutants in rivers and other source waters throughout Ohio are contaminating drinking water statewide, a citizen monitoring project has found. Tap water in a dozen Ohio communities is contaminated - at levels well above federal safety standards or guidelines - with pesticides, chlorinated compounds and other chemicals known to cause cancer, birth defects and other illnesses, according to tap water tests commissioned by the Environmental Working Group (EWG) and Ohio Citizen Action.

Read More
News Release
Thursday, October 1, 1998

Pollutants in rivers and other source waters throughout Ohio are contaminating drinking water statewide, a citizen monitoring project has found.

Read More
Key Issues:
News Release
Thursday, October 1, 1998

The federal government and the states have adopted a high- cost, high-risk strategy in their drinking water programs, where consumers pay water suppliers to try to make polluted water drinkable. In spite of the vigorous efforts of drinking water providers, tap water made from dirty rivers and lakes is often host to multiple toxic chemicals, or is contaminated with the by-products of the clean-up process itself.

 

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Thursday, May 21, 1998
Five years after the Clinton Administration promised a bold initiative to reduce pesticide use and make children's health the top priority in federal pesticide regulation, the government has done little or nothing to reduce toxic pesticide use, pesticide residues in food, or pesticide contamination of drinking water, according to a new report by the Environmental Working Group (EWG). Read More
News Release
Wednesday, August 13, 1997

Mounting concern over long term health risks and the skyrocketing cost of water treatment associated with pesticide contaminated tapwater in hundreds of midwestern towns has forged an unprecedented alliance between water utilities, engineers, and chemists, and environmental protection groups.

Read More
News Release
Thursday, February 1, 1996

An Environmental Working Group review of nearly 200,000 water sampling records found that over two million people -- including approximately 15,000 infants under the age of four months -- drank water from 2,016 water systems that were reported to EPA for violating the nitrate standard at least once between 1986 and 1995.

Read More
Key Issues:
AgMag
Blog Post
Thursday, February 1, 1996

Nitrate in drinking water at levels greater than the Federal standard of 10 parts per million (ppm) can cause methemoglobinemia, a potentially fatal condition in infants commonly known as blue-baby syndrome. According to Dr. Burton Kross, of the University of Iowa's Center For International Rural and Environmental Health, nitrate poisoning via drinking water contamination "certainly contributes to national infant death rate statistics" (Johnson and Kross 1990). Agriculture is the primary source of nitrate contamination.

Read More
Key Issues:
Reports & Consumer Guides
Wednesday, October 31, 1990
 

Drinking plenty of good, clean water is important for a healthy body.

Read More
Reports & Consumer Guides

Pages

Subscribe to Tap Water