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Water

Nothing is more important to your health and quality of life than safe drinking water and clean streams and lakes. Across the country, pollution from farms is one of the primary reasons water is no longer clean or safe. Agriculture is the leading source of pollution of rivers and streams surveyed by U.S. government experts, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Thankfully, if we make simple changes in the way we farm, we can take a big step toward clean water.

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

In 2016, an EWG report found that chromium-6 – a cancer-causing compound made notorious by the film “Erin Brockovich” – contaminated the tap water supplies of 218 million Americans in all 50 states. But our just-released Tap Water Database shows the problem is even worse than that.

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

In the face of opposition by the power industry, Environmental Protection Agency chief Scott Pruitt is planning to scrap an Obama-era rule to curb discharges of lead, arsenic and mercury from power plants into sources of drinking water. 

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Key Issues:
News Release
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Scott Pruitt, polluters’ puppet and head of the Environmental Protection Agency, knows most Americans are strongly opposed to his anti-public health, anti-kids, anti-science agenda. That’s why he does all he can to hide it.

Photo courtesy of Gage Skidmore via Flickr.com

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Key Issues:
Planet Trump
Article
Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Lead was banned from paint in 1978, and from gasoline in 1996. But two years ago the water-poisoning scandal in Flint, Michigan, turned the nation's attention to the tragic truth that lead still threatens Americans – especially children.

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News and Analysis
Article
Monday, August 14, 2017

Environmental groups have brought two suits against the Trump administration for weakening key rules establishing how the Environmental Protection Agency will regulate toxic chemicals found in consumer products, building materials, and work places, as well as in our drinking water and food.
 

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News Release
Friday, August 11, 2017

Here’s some news you can use going into the weekend.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, August 11, 2017

If you're one of the 44 million people relying on a private well for drinking water, here's what you should know and do to make sure your water is safe.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, August 4, 2017

Here’s some news you can use going into the weekend.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, August 3, 2017

Since the release of EWG’s National Tap Water Database just over a week ago, this question has been popping up a lot: “What now? Should I switch over to bottled water?”

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News and Analysis
Article
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

An industrial solvent classified as a likely carcinogen, which is also a common impurity in cosmetics and household cleaners, was detected in samples of drinking water supplies for nearly 90 million Americans in 45 states, according to testing data from local utilities analyzed by EWG.

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Reports & Consumer Guides
Tuesday, August 1, 2017

If you’re concerned about what’s in your water, buying a water filter is a smart next step.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, July 28, 2017

Here’s some news you can use going into the weekend.

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News and Analysis
Article
Friday, July 28, 2017

EWG’s just-released Tap Water Database shows that a startling number of cancer-causing chemicals contaminate the nation’s drinking water. Of 250 different contaminants detected in tests by local utilities, 93 are linked to an increased risk of developing cancer.

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Key Issues:
Cancer
Article
Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Starting today, the vast majority of Americans can learn about every potentially harmful chemical in their drinking water and what scientists say are the safe levels of those contaminants. EWG’s new national Tap Water Database is the most complete source available on the quality of U.S. drinking water, aggregating and analyzing data from almost 50,000 public water systems in all 50 states and the District of Columbia.

 
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News Release
Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Here’s how our database and the information it delivers stacks up against a typical CCR.

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News and Analysis
Article
Thursday, July 20, 2017

In his first six monthsPresident Trump’s legislative agenda has stalled in Congress. But through regulatory rollbacks, he is waging a slash-and-burn assault on public health and the environment.

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News Release
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

In a unanimous vote today, the California Water Resources Control Board adopted a stringent, health-protective drinking water limit for 1,2,3-trichloropropane, or TCP, an extremely potent carcinogen that was formerly an impurity in pesticides once widely used in the state’s San Joaquin Valley.

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Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

President Trump said last week that in his first months in office he has accomplished "more ... than practically any president in history." His claim is not supported by the facts, but at the six-month mark one thing is indisputable: No president and administration have ever done so much so quickly to roll back protections for children's health and safety.

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Planet Trump
Article
Wednesday, July 12, 2017

Below and attached are comments EWG submitted in support of the National Toxicology Program’s evaluation of the cancer hazards of haloacetic acids, water disinfection byproducts found in tap water served to millions of Americans.

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Key Issues:
Testimonies & Official Correspondence
Thursday, June 29, 2017

Last week Chemours – a DuPont spinoff company that inherited liability for some of its parent's nastiest toxic messes – announced "voluntary actions" to clean up and eliminate pollution from a highly fluorinated chemical, which is a potential human carcinogen. The company’s Fayetteville, N.C., plant has been discharging the chemical, GenX, into the Cape Fear River since 1980.

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News and Analysis
Article

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