EWG News and Analysis

The latest from EWG’s staff of experts >>

The latest from EWG’s staff of experts

Thursday, May 21, 2020

Meat and poultry processing plants are hot spots for COVID-19 outbreaks, constricting the supply chains for beef, chicken and pork – and sending their prices soaring. 

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

The news, announced Tuesday, that Johnson & Johnson will soon end the sale of baby powder with talc is long overdue. 

Because talc and asbestos can form in the same parent rock, cosmetics made with talc can become contaminated with the deadly carcinogen, which is responsible for the death of thousands of Americans every year.

Monday, May 18, 2020

As many hair salons remain closed months into the national shutdown triggered by the coronavirus pandemic, at-home hair dyes are flying off store shelves. But many of these products may contain potentially harmful ingredients.

Friday, May 15, 2020

This week, EWG broke down how America’s farmworkers are imperiled when it comes to contracting COVID-19.

Thursday, May 14, 2020

Counties with or near meatpacking plants have almost twice the rate of known COVID-19 infections as the national average, according to a geospatial analysis by the Environmental Working Group. 

Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Depending on the season, an estimated 1 million to 2.7 million workers, mostly undocumented, toil on the nation’s farms. Without farmworkers, the American food system would collapse – and during the coronavirus pandemic, they are especially essential to ensuring that food arrives on grocery shelves.

Friday, May 8, 2020

My life’s work is to protect and promote babies’ health, and as all parents know (and now the whole world is learning, or seeing in the background on a Zoom call), our personal and professional lives are never really separate.

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

At least 2,500 industrial facilities across the nation could be discharging the toxic fluorinated compounds known as PFAS into the air and water, according to an updated EWG analysis of government data. But one state has seen substantial drops in industrial PFAS discharges: Michigan. Now other states are learning from Michigan’s success.

Tuesday, April 28, 2020

Being stuck at home for weeks on end stinks. But it’s necessary to flatten the curve of the coronavirus, so let’s make the best of it.

EWG came up with ways to take advantage of this time of self-isolation with little or no contact with other people besides those in your pandemic “pod.” Here are five ideas to consider that can benefit your skin and your overall health.

Friday, April 24, 2020

EWG News Roundup (4/24): Here’s some news you can use going into the weekend.

Thursday, April 23, 2020

Research by the Environmental Working Group and the PFAS Project at Northeastern University’s Social Science Environmental Health Research Institute, or SSEHRI, has helped to map the crisis of contamination with the toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS, now recorded at more than 1,400 locations in 49 states. 

Thursday, April 23, 2020

The Trump administration’s plan to spend billions to address the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic on agriculture may help industrial-scale produce farms but does little to assist farmworkers threatened by COVID-19, a new EWG analysis shows.

Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Firefighting foam is one of the most significant sources of water contamination from the toxic fluorinated chemicals known as PFAS. PFAS-based firefighting foams have been widely used by the military, fire training centers and airports for five decades, even though the Pentagon has known since the 1970s that PFAS is toxic.

Key Issues: 
Monday, April 20, 2020

As the coronavirus pandemic continues, farmworkers are risking their lives to feed us. So why are some officials in the Trump administration and some Republicans in Congress trying to cut farmworkers’ pay?

Thursday, April 16, 2020

More than 20 million people grow, harvest, pack, process, transport, serve and sell our food. The food and farm industry rivals the energy and health care sectors in terms of number of jobs.

Tuesday, April 14, 2020

Coronavirus sufferers in places with dirtier air are far more likely to die than those in areas with cleaner air, according to the first nationwide study of the connection between fossil fuel pollution and deaths from COVID-19.

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